UPCOMING EVENTS

  • 07/30/16 - Miles Schuman...   07/30/16 - Ron Funk, Jeff Knosp, Jim Lewis...   07/30/16 - Horst Auctioneers...   07/30/16 - Progressive Auction Company...   07/30/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   07/30/16 - Ron Berger...   07/30/16 - Wagner Auction Service...   07/30/16 - Michael J. Stasak, Jr., Michael Stasak, III, Laurel Fox...   07/30/16 - Gold Rush Pays...   07/29-30/16 - Daniel A. Carter...   07/30/16 - Gateway Gallery Auction, Inc....   07/30/16 - CW Odds and Ends...   07/31/16 - Costea's Auction Gallery...   07/31/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   07/30-31/16 - Morphy Auctions...   08/01/16 - Toomey Auction Service, Inc....   08/03/16 - Wilson's Auction Gallery...   08/04/16 - Alderfer Auction & Appraisal...   08/05/16 - John Hums Auction...   08/05/16 - Garth's Auctioneers & Appraisers...   08/06/16 - Rich Harry...   08/06/16 - Blums...   08/06/16 - Adams Auction Sales Service...   08/06/16 - Probst Family Auctions...   08/06/16 - George Miller IV Auction Co....   08/07/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   08/08/16 - Gateway Gallery Auction, Inc....   08/09/16 - Uniques & Antiques Auction Sales...   08/09/16 - Bob Brenner...   08/10/16 - Curtis Wilson...   08/10/16 - Alderfer Auction & Appraisal...   08/10/16 - Diefenderfer Auction Company, LLC...   08/11/16 - Claystrong Enterprises...   08/11/16 - Barr Davis...   08/13/16 - Les Beyer...   08/13/16 - Howard B. Parzow...   08/13/16 - Cabin Fever Auctions...   08/13/16 - Lloyd Ralston Toys...   08/13/16 - Keystone Auctions LLC...   08/13/16 - Maurer's Auctions...   08/13-14/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   08/24-26/16 - James D. Julia...   08/27/16 - Cabin Fever Auctions...   08/27/16 - Jim Wroda Auctions...   08/27/16 - Boltz Auction Company...   09/09-11/16 - Rock Island Auction Company...   
  • 07/30/16 - Miles Schuman...   07/30/16 - Ron Funk, Jeff Knosp, Jim Lewis...   07/30/16 - Horst Auctioneers...   07/30/16 - Progressive Auction Company...   07/30/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   07/30/16 - Ron Berger...   07/30/16 - Wagner Auction Service...   07/30/16 - Michael J. Stasak, Jr., Michael Stasak, III, Laurel Fox...   07/30/16 - Gold Rush Pays...   07/29-30/16 - Daniel A. Carter...   07/30/16 - Gateway Gallery Auction, Inc....   07/30/16 - CW Odds and Ends...   07/31/16 - Costea's Auction Gallery...   07/31/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   07/30-31/16 - Morphy Auctions...   08/01/16 - Toomey Auction Service, Inc....   08/03/16 - Wilson's Auction Gallery...   08/04/16 - Alderfer Auction & Appraisal...   08/05/16 - John Hums Auction...   08/05/16 - Garth's Auctioneers & Appraisers...   08/06/16 - Rich Harry...   08/06/16 - Blums...   08/06/16 - Adams Auction Sales Service...   08/06/16 - Probst Family Auctions...   08/06/16 - George Miller IV Auction Co....   08/07/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   08/08/16 - Gateway Gallery Auction, Inc....   08/09/16 - Uniques & Antiques Auction Sales...   08/09/16 - Bob Brenner...   08/10/16 - Curtis Wilson...   08/10/16 - Alderfer Auction & Appraisal...   08/10/16 - Diefenderfer Auction Company, LLC...   08/11/16 - Claystrong Enterprises...   08/11/16 - Barr Davis...   08/13/16 - Les Beyer...   08/13/16 - Howard B. Parzow...   08/13/16 - Cabin Fever Auctions...   08/13/16 - Lloyd Ralston Toys...   08/13/16 - Keystone Auctions LLC...   08/13/16 - Maurer's Auctions...   08/13-14/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   08/24-26/16 - James D. Julia...   08/27/16 - Cabin Fever Auctions...   08/27/16 - Jim Wroda Auctions...   08/27/16 - Boltz Auction Company...   09/09-11/16 - Rock Island Auction Company...   
  • 07/30/16 - Miles Schuman...   07/30/16 - Ron Funk, Jeff Knosp, Jim Lewis...   07/30/16 - Horst Auctioneers...   07/30/16 - Progressive Auction Company...   07/30/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   07/30/16 - Ron Berger...   07/30/16 - Wagner Auction Service...   07/30/16 - Michael J. Stasak, Jr., Michael Stasak, III, Laurel Fox...   07/30/16 - Gold Rush Pays...   07/29-30/16 - Daniel A. Carter...   07/30/16 - Gateway Gallery Auction, Inc....   07/30/16 - CW Odds and Ends...   07/31/16 - Costea's Auction Gallery...   07/31/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   07/30-31/16 - Morphy Auctions...   08/01/16 - Toomey Auction Service, Inc....   08/03/16 - Wilson's Auction Gallery...   08/04/16 - Alderfer Auction & Appraisal...   08/05/16 - John Hums Auction...   08/05/16 - Garth's Auctioneers & Appraisers...   08/06/16 - Rich Harry...   08/06/16 - Blums...   08/06/16 - Adams Auction Sales Service...   08/06/16 - Probst Family Auctions...   08/06/16 - George Miller IV Auction Co....   08/07/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   08/08/16 - Gateway Gallery Auction, Inc....   08/09/16 - Uniques & Antiques Auction Sales...   08/09/16 - Bob Brenner...   08/10/16 - Curtis Wilson...   08/10/16 - Alderfer Auction & Appraisal...   08/10/16 - Diefenderfer Auction Company, LLC...   08/11/16 - Claystrong Enterprises...   08/11/16 - Barr Davis...   08/13/16 - Les Beyer...   08/13/16 - Howard B. Parzow...   08/13/16 - Cabin Fever Auctions...   08/13/16 - Lloyd Ralston Toys...   08/13/16 - Keystone Auctions LLC...   08/13/16 - Maurer's Auctions...   08/13-14/16 - Cordier Auctions & Appraisals...   08/24-26/16 - James D. Julia...   08/27/16 - Cabin Fever Auctions...   08/27/16 - Jim Wroda Auctions...   08/27/16 - Boltz Auction Company...   09/09-11/16 - Rock Island Auction Company...   
Are Resellers All That Bad?

July 28, 2016

Are Resellers All That Bad?

By Shawn Surmick

On Feb. 27, 2016 Nintendo released the long awaited Pokemon Anniversary edition of its popular New Nintendo 3DS portable video game system in the United States. Its release celebrated the 20 year anniversary of the Pokemon franchise. The system came packaged with two different interchangeable face plates gracing two of its popular Pokemon video game characters along with two different classic Pokemon games preinstalled and it retailed for $199.99. Due to the limited availability of the system, preorders were readily available at most retailers months in advance, and a full sell out was expected at launch. Within 48 hours of the system’s release prices of the system on eBay would reach close to $400 before settling back down to a respectable $300-plus as of today.
Immediately upon the system’s release vocal critics of Nintendo took to the internet to publically criticize the company for not releasing enough systems to ensure more were made available outside of the allotted preorders - regardless of the fact that the system was readily available for preorder several months in advance with virtually no reports of retailers turning away customers who prepaid to get the system when it became available at launch. These same vocal critics have also railed against the resellers of these limited edition releases who attempt to profit off of its limited availability.
Fast forward several months later and the highly awaited Nintendo 3DS game Monster Hunter Generations was announced for a July 15, 2016 release date in the United States. To celebrate the game’s release Nintendo once again agreed to produce a limited edition version of its popular New Nintendo 3DS handheld video game system that would feature a limited edition system design with art work based off the Monster Hunter video game franchise. Much like the limited edition Pokemon Anniversary system preorders would be taken by most major retailers several months before release. It was also announced that the system would be a limited edition release and only receive one production run. Within hours after the system’s launch on July 15, the system could be seen selling on eBay for close to $300, which is slightly less than the premium achieved by the highly coveted Pokemon Anniversary Edition. As expected, vocal Nintendo enthusiasts took to the internet to criticize Nintendo for not ensuring the system was readily available and also rail against the so-called scalpers who were selling the system at a premium.
Limited editions of popular video game consoles are nothing new. Manufacturers of various video game systems made by Nintendo, Sony, and even Microsoft have been doing this since they entered the highly competitive video game industry. The concept of releasing limited edition video game consoles in various colors and designs was developed mainly by Nintendo who thought it would be a great marketing tool to get consumers to buy more than one kind of the same video game system. The plan proved to be highly successful and Nintendo has been doing it ever since the very first multi-colored Game Boy Pocket portable video game systems graced retailer’s shelves in the early 1990s in a rainbow of colors.
Today it has become an expected custom with most manufacturers releasing several different versions of their popular systems in various forms and limited edition designs almost every year. Video game collectors and enthusiasts should be used to this by now, but judging from some of the comments from the most vocal fans they continue to rail against manufacturers of these systems because some lucky collectors attempt to get more than one limited release in hopes of selling them for a profit. This practice is not hurting anyone else’s chances of getting these limited releases because production runs are made based on the amount of preorders reported. It should be noted that most retailers limit the amount of these items that one individual can preorder as well. To be fair, there are ways around this. Individual buyers can use different addresses, contact information, and credit cards for each subsequent preorder, but in all reality since production runs are based on the allotted amount of preorders being generated. The actual amount of systems is not being affected in that just because one buyer finds a way to get ahold of two systems, it does not mean that someone else is going without. One could easily argue that video game enthusiasts have had more than two decades of experience to learn how this process works. So why all the angst?
This brings me to a valid topic of discussion - are so-called scalpers and resellers really to blame for increased prices on the secondary marketplace? Judging by vocal Nintendo fans you would think the answer would be yes. However, why didn’t these vocal critics just preorder a system if they wanted one? As an avid Nintendo enthusiast I preordered both the Pokemon Anniversary New 3DS system and the Monster Hunter Generations New 3DS system as well. I had no trouble whatsoever preordering both systems from my local GameStop video game retailer. I even preordered my Monster Hunter Generations New 3DS system roughly one week before its scheduled release and was able to secure a unit on launch day without issue. In both cases I didn’t have to wait in long lines or show up at the retailer’s specific location at a certain date or time. I could have even preordered both of these items online in the comfort of my living room.
This all raises the question as to what exactly is the anti-scalper/anti-reseller crowd complaining about? Had they wanted one of these systems for their own collections they had several months of advance notice to preorder one appropriately. Over the next year or two Nintendo will be announcing and releasing several other limited edition systems. These too will be readily available for preorder months before their scheduled release dates and almost like clockwork the vocal critics will take to the internet to vent about their frustration because they could not get one on launch day and someone who did is selling theirs at a significant markup. Is this anger justified? Why shouldn’t the person who was able to simply preorder a limited edition commodity be able to profit from the sale if he or she chooses? Is this not simple economics at work (i.e. supply and demand)? Is this not what collecting and scarcity is all about? Isn’t the greater antiques and collectibles trade a prime example of these economic theories at work?
Sadly, there is a very dangerous false sense of entitlement developing in certain collecting fields. The idea that: “If I can’t profit, neither should you.” Ironically, this mentality is present in most collecting fields where mass speculation is also present. The greater antiques and collectibles trade works on basic economic principles that drive demand. In future articles this concept and its repercussions will be looked at in greater detail. Until that time may I advise the vocal critics to simply preorder the items in question instead of complaining about those who do?

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